The State and French households have a common objective, namely to reduce their energy bills. The high cost of energy, its dependence on a local distributor or a foreign country and the negative impact of its use on the environment are all valid reasons to take action to reduce fossil fuel consumption.

French energy policy

The POPE law (Programming Law laying down the Guidelines for Energy Policy) of 2005, the law on the energy transition for green growth of 2015 and the thermal regulation updated in January 2018 aim to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels in buildings, the second most polluting sector after transport. Standards for new construction ensure limited energy needs, but measures must also be taken for the existing housing stock where lack of insulation increases energy needs.

The energy bonus, also known as the Energy Savings Certificate scheme, was created by the POPE law. It consists of financial assistance for thermal renovation work such as insulating attic spaces or insulating heating and domestic hot water pipes to save energy. The funds are paid by energy suppliers who are obliged to respect a distribution quota under penalty of having to pay heavy penalties.

The importance of reducing fossil fuel consumption

The first oil crisis of 1973 pushed France to reduce its energy consumption. It understands the risks of its dependence on a foreign country for the supply of energy, in this case oil, which can stop the supply and increase prices as it sees fit. Nuclear power and the diversification of supply sources partly solve the situation.

At the end of the 1980s, another problem emerged when a clear link was established between climate change and the use of fossil fuels responsible for greenhouse gas emissions. The energy policy then strengthens building insulation standards and begins the transition to the use of non-polluting renewable energies. Every effort must be made to reduce the consumption of polluting energy as much as possible, and this requires encouraging the population to carry out energy renovation work.

Insulation and insulation

Insulating domestic hot water and heating pipes saves energy and immediately reduces your bill by about 10%. This work, which consists of surrounding the pipe with insulating material, prevents heat loss, especially where the pipes pass through unheated areas. The hot water tank can also be insulated if it is located in the garage or basement in order to maintain the temperature between the production site and the various distribution points in the circuit.

To benefit from the energy bonus and thus carry out the work without having to pay, the building must be at least 2 years old and the work must be entrusted to a recognized EGR (Recognised Guarantor of the Environment) contractor who knows which materials to use to comply with the regulations in force. He takes care of the premium request before the start of the work. Both the owner and the tenant can benefit from the assistance, whether it is a detached house or a building.